Latest Events

Topic: 
OneHealth: An approach to understanding the ecology of rabies in India
Speaker: 
Dr. Abi Tamim Vanak, Senior Fellow at ATREE, Bangalore
Date & Time: 
24 Apr 2019 - 3:00pm
Event Type: 
Invited Seminar
Venue: 
CES Seminar Hall, 3rd Floor, Biological Sciences Building
Coffee/Tea: 
Before the talk
Abstract:

India has among-st the highest burden of canine-mediated rabies in the world. India also has among-st the highest numbers of free-ranging dogs in the world, a lax dog ownership policy, and animal rights laws that conflate population management with rabies control. The failure to control rabies in India is a multi-faceted problem: a lack of systematic surveillance, limited knowledge on rabies dynamics in multi-host systems and poor implementation of mitigation measures. In this talk, I will explore the various facets of this problem, and show how a OneHealth approach that integrates Ecology allows for a better understanding of rabies dynamics in India and the development of targeted intervention techniques.

Speaker Bio: 
Dr. Abi Vanak, Senior Fellow at ATREE, is an animal ecologist with research interests in movement ecology, disease ecology, OneHealth, savanna ecosystems, invasive species (both plant and animal) and wildlife in human-dominated systems. His work has spanned from studying the movement ecology of large mammals, to the conservation of semi-arid savanna grasslands in peninsular India and the adaptation of mesocarnivores to human-dominated landscapes. His current work focuses on the outcome of interactions between species at the interface of humans, domestic animals and wildlife in semi-arid savannas and agro-ecosystems. Model systems range from free-ranging domestic dogs in cities and villages, mesocarnivores in an agri-savanna matrix to African savanna elephant, and the impacts of Prosopis juliflora on ecosystems and livelihoods. His interests in OneHealth systems and disease ecology include the dynamics of rabies transmission in multi-host systems, and in understanding the role of mammals in the transmission dynamics of vector borne diseases.
Topic: 
Distribution, activity budget and feeding ecology of Himalayan gray langur in north western Himalaya.
Speaker: 
Mehreen Khaleel, IISc
Date & Time: 
23 Apr 2019 - 11:00am
Event Type: 
Thesis Progress
Venue: 
CES Seminar Hall, 3rd Floor, Biological Sciences Building
Coffee/Tea: 
Before the talk
Abstract:

Himalayan gray langur is a little-known endangered primate, endemic to Himalayas. Its distribution and ecology are poorly known. In Kashmir and adjoining regions, it is likely at risk of extinction due to land use change and conflict with humans. In my thesis I assess the current distribution of this species in Kashmir and try to understand how this species copes up with seasonality in terms of food availability, quality and temperature differences.
In the first part of my thesis, we, aimed to ascertain the current distribution of this species in Kashmir and identify sites which face human-langur conflict. Using well-structured questionnaire and on-ground surveys we have attempted to determine the spatial distribution in Kashmir region. Results suggest Himalayan gray langurs to be distributed in two different habitat types dominated by broad-leaved deciduous forest and coniferous forests within an elevation range of 1700-3000 m. There was found little conflict in the area based on the questionnaire surveys conducted. Conservation education and awareness programs in schools and colleges were conducted throughout to impart knowledge about the existence of this primate species in their region.
Second part of my thesis involves understanding activity patterns and time budgeting in different seasons. Activity budget is an important component as it determines how animals interact with their environment by adopting various behavioural strategies to maximize energy and reproductive success. Various factors are known to effect activity patterns in primates such as food availability, quality, and temperature, etc. These factors influence the time allocation on different daily activities. Food availability is known to either increase or decrease the time primates spend on feeding and resting. In the case of Himalayan gray langur, it is expected to increase feeding time in winter when food available is scarce. Increasing time of feeding helps them thermoregulate in sub-zero temperatures. From the study, similar results on seasonal time budgeting were obtained. As far as daily activity budgeting was concerned, two feeding peaks during winter were observed, in the morning and evening. During summer, only one feeding peak was observed in the afternoon. This discordance may be explained by analyzing their diet and other environmental factors.

Topic: 
Thesis Colloquium
Speaker: 
Harish Prakash, IISc
Date & Time: 
12 Jun 2019 - 3:00pm
Event Type: 
Thesis Colloquium
Venue: 
CES Seminar Hall, 3rd Floor, Biological Sciences Building
Coffee/Tea: 
Before the talk
Abstract:

Thesis Colloquium

Topic: 
Thesis Colloquium
Speaker: 
Aswathy Nair, IISc
Date & Time: 
31 May 2019 - 11:00am
Event Type: 
Thesis Colloquium
Venue: 
CES Seminar Hall, 3rd Floor, Biological Sciences Building
Coffee/Tea: 
Before the talk
Abstract:

Thesis Colloquium

Topic: 
Condition dependent signalling and mating behaviour in the tree cricket Oecanthus henryi
Speaker: 
Sambita Modak, IISc
Date & Time: 
16 May 2019 - 11:00am
Event Type: 
Thesis Colloquium
Venue: 
CES Seminar Hall, 3rd Floor, Biological Sciences Building
Coffee/Tea: 
Before the talk
Abstract:

Thesis Colloquium

Topic: 
Tolerance to extreme temperature and drought in tropical trees: implications for responses to global warming
Speaker: 
Dr. Deepak Barua, Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Pune
Date & Time: 
15 Apr 2019 - 3:00pm
Event Type: 
Invited Seminar
Venue: 
CES Seminar Hall, 3rd Floor, Biological Sciences Building
Coffee/Tea: 
Before the talk
Abstract:

Tropical forests may be particularly vulnerable to extreme climatic conditions. These forests contribute disproportionately to global ecosystem services, and have dominant effects on global land-atmosphere interactions. Thus, understanding the responses of tropical forests to extreme temperatures and drought remain a major limitation in predicting global vegetation responses to future climate change. Work in my group examines how integration of anatomical, morphological and physiological traits translate to plant performance in changing environmental conditions particularly when experiencing extreme temperature and drought. Can this understanding help predict behaviour of tropical trees in the field; growth, mortality and regeneration over longer time scales; and ultimately, to distribution of species over environmental gradients, and responses of tropical forests to global warming? I highlight this work with two studies. The first, investigated the upper temperature limits of photosynthetic function. We asked how high temperature tolerance was related to morphological and physiological traits, and examined the consequences of this in the context of global warming. Our results show that tropical trees are precariously close to their upper thermal limits, and likely going to be severely affected by future warming. Importantly, thermotolerance differed between species and was related to leaf functional traits and photosynthetic rates. In the second study, we investigated water-use strategies in tropical trees, examining water uptake under well watered condition, and drought tolerance when water was limited. We asked if water uptake and drought tolerance were related to stem xylem anatomical traits, and tested the relationship between water transport efficiency and safety. Xylem size was positively related to water uptake, but negatively related to drought tolerance, resulting in a tradeoff where water uptake and growth under well watered conditions was negatively related to drought tolerance when water was limiting. These results suggest that tropical trees with acquisitive resource use strategies may be more negatively affected by increased temperatures and drought, and future climates may favour slower growing species with conservative resource use strategies.

Topic: 
Web of life: deceit and cooperation in spiders
Speaker: 
Dr. Divya Bellur Uma, Faculty, Azim Premji University
Date & Time: 
10 Apr 2019 - 3:00pm
Event Type: 
Invited Seminar
Venue: 
CES Seminar Hall, 3rd Floor, Biological Sciences Building
Coffee/Tea: 
Before the talk
Abstract:

Spiders, one of the top invertebrate predators in the terrestrial ecosystems are an ideal system to study ecological patterns and processes. Their hidden, but fascinating lives is full of drama: they are voracious predators, but get eaten by their own kind; they are also masters of trickery. In this talk, I will narrate two spider stories. One is of deception in the spider world: how ant mimicking spiders doubly deceive both visual predators such as jumping spiders and chemical predators such as mud-dauber wasps. Second story is about cooperation in hunting and web-building in social spiders. I will specifically talk about some recent work on how group size and hunger can influence the web architecture of social spiders.

Topic: 
Thesis Colloquium
Speaker: 
Jitesh Jhawar, CES, IISc
Date & Time: 
30 Apr 2019 - 11:00am
Event Type: 
Thesis Colloquium
Venue: 
CES Seminar Hall, 3rd Floor, Biological Sciences Building
Coffee/Tea: 
Before the talk
Abstract:

Thesis Colloquium

Topic: 
A place for everything and everything in its place: Spatial organization of individuals on the nests of Ropalidia marginata
Speaker: 
Nitika Sharma, CES, IISc
Date & Time: 
22 Apr 2019 - 10:00am
Event Type: 
Thesis Colloquium
Venue: 
CES Seminar Hall, 3rd Floor, Biological Sciences Building
Coffee/Tea: 
After the talk
Abstract:

Animals across taxa and habitats are known to use available space non-randomly. They are known to concentrate their space use around locations rich in food, mates or refuges. There could also be cascading effects of such disproportionate use for the individual itself, its conspecifics or even the landscape it inhabits. In addition to using their habitats non-randomly for foraging, avoiding predators and optimizing homing routes; some social insects were also discovered to use their nest space non-randomly. We tested if the primitively eusocial paper wasp Ropalidia marginata used its nest space non-randomly and indeed found a majority of individuals using parts of the nest more intensively than expected by chance (spatial fidelity). We tested several hypotheses that were primarily based on studies on ants, to understand the relationship between the social and spatial organization of individuals in social insect colonies. We found that the non-random space use by adults within R. marginata nests is a result of maximizing nutritional exchange and minimizing disease spread in the densely populated colonies. In addition, in order to understand the role of non-random space use by adults on task performance, we tracked individuals while they performed the task of food distribution, as it is the most conspicuous and important task in social insect colonies. We found that wasps within a feeding bout cooperatively (and often repeatedly) fed the randomly distributed larvae, thus minimizing the chances of any larvae going hungry. Each wasp that fed larvae in a feeding bout optimized its feeding route by minimizing the distance per unit larvae it fed. We conclude that understanding the spatial organization of adults might help us better understand the mechanism of efficient division of labour on social insect nests.

Topic: 
Thesis Colloquium
Speaker: 
Madhura Amdekar, CES, IISc
Date & Time: 
10 May 2019 - 11:00am
Event Type: 
Thesis Colloquium
Venue: 
CES Seminar Hall, 3rd Floor, Biological Sciences Building
Coffee/Tea: 
Before the talk
Abstract:

Thesis Colloquium

Pages

ataköy escort replika saat instagram takipçi satın al porno izle Paykasa

Canlı Tv

instagram takipçi cast ajans www.huluhub.com ankara escort paykasa Ataşehir Escort jigolo kayit instagram takipci hilesi bayan arkadaş arıyorum jigolo olmak istiyorum istanbul nakliye istanbul evden eve nakliyat istanbul nakliyat dosya dolabı bedava jigolo jigolo olmak istiyorum jigolo sitesi jigolo kirala