Latest Events

Topic: 
Thesis Proposal Presentation
Speaker: 
Hugo de Souza, CES, IISc
Date & Time: 
13 Nov 2019 - 3:00pm
Event Type: 
Thesis Proposal Presentation
Venue: 
CES Seminar Hall, 3rd Floor, Biological Sciences Building
Abstract:

Thesis Proposal Presentation

Topic: 
Thesis Proposal Presentation
Speaker: 
Shatarupa Sarkar, CES, IISc
Date & Time: 
27 Nov 2019 - 3:00pm
Event Type: 
Thesis Proposal Presentation
Venue: 
CES Seminar Hall, 3rd Floor, Biological Sciences Building
Abstract:

Thesis Proposal Presentation

Topic: 
Thesis Progress Presentation
Speaker: 
Nitin Saxena, CES, IISc
Date & Time: 
20 Nov 2019 - 3:30pm
Event Type: 
Thesis Progress
Venue: 
CES Seminar Hall, 3rd Floor, Biological Sciences Building
Abstract:

Thesis Progress Presentation

Topic: 
Thesis Progress Presentation
Speaker: 
Akanksha Rathore, CES, IISc
Date & Time: 
20 Nov 2019 - 3:00pm
Event Type: 
Thesis Progress
Venue: 
CES Seminar Hall, 3rd Floor, Biological Sciences Building
Abstract:

Thesis Progress Presentation

Topic: 
Thesis Proposal Presentation
Speaker: 
Aravind Sridharan, CES, IISc
Date & Time: 
6 Nov 2019 - 3:00pm
Event Type: 
Thesis Proposal Presentation
Venue: 
CES Seminar Hall, 3rd Floor, Biological Sciences Building
Abstract:

Thesis Proposal Presentation

Topic: 
Thesis Progress Presentation
Speaker: 
Chinta Siddharthan, CES, IISc
Date & Time: 
30 Oct 2019 - 3:00pm
Event Type: 
Thesis Progress
Venue: 
CES Seminar Hall, 3rd Floor, Biological Sciences Building
Abstract:

Thesis Progress Presentation

Topic: 
Understanding the phylogeny and biogeography of the Humpback dolphin (Sousa spp.) in peninsular India
Speaker: 
Mihir Sule, CES, IISc
Date & Time: 
9 Oct 2019 - 3:00pm
Event Type: 
Thesis Proposal Presentation
Venue: 
CES Seminar Hall, 3rd Floor, Biological Sciences Building
Coffee/Tea: 
Before the talk
Abstract:

Marine systems appear to be more homogenous than terrestrial environments with few apparent barriers to dispersal. Despite this, population structuring and speciation are seen in organisms, even with high dispersal capabilities. For my thesis, I am studying a genus of tropical obligate near-shore dolphins and understand how speciation my have occurred in areas where no barriers are apparent and dispersal seems to have occurred across large distances in spite of conducive habitats. The study aims to resolve the taxonomic identity of the Sousa spp. complex in India, and examine population structure and connectivity for the Indian animals and understand how they place in the global phylogeny for the genus.

Topic: 
Traits, distribution and conservation status of woody plant species of the Western Ghats
Speaker: 
Kesang Bhutia, CES, IISc
Date & Time: 
17 Sep 2019 - 2:30pm
Event Type: 
Thesis Colloquium
Venue: 
CES Seminar Hall, 3rd Floor, Biological Sciences Building
Coffee/Tea: 
After the talk
Abstract:

Discerning spatial patterns of biodiversity and understanding their proximate and ultimate causes is central to biogeography and macroecology. There has been substantial research on species richness along latitudinal and altitudinal gradients. Both ecological and evolutionary factors may drive diversity along these gradients but their effect on the distribution of species as mediated by species-specific traits has received far less attention.
In my first chapter, I focused on species functional trait variation along a latitudinal gradient. I found the effect of environmental filtering at higher latitudes, suggesting that environmental does play an important role in the distribution of species. Studies involving species environment relationships are important in identification and conservation of biodiverse areas. They are also important in the context of rapid climate change and in answering questions as to whether species will move to track their habitat or adapt to new environmental conditions.
To further understand this, in my second chapter, I modeled the potential distribution of 153 endemic woody species of the Western Ghats. Species distribution models (SDMs) are invaluable tools in mapping and conservation of endemic species, and also to understand the relationship between a species and its abiotic and biotic environment and which in turn can help us to generate a predictive map of where populations could potentially occur. For modeling the distribution of these species, I used MaxEnt and Ensemble methods. Species distribution models (SDMs) are used to understand the relationship between species and their environment which is then used to generate a predictive map of where populations could potentially occur. I compared these two methods and to show that Ensemble methods are better than single models. The most important environmental factor varied greatly from one species to another. However, it was observed that Precipitation of the Coldest Quarter, Slope and Forest Canopy Height contributed the most for a number of species.
For my third chapter, I used the results of species distribution modeling (binary maps) from the previous chapter to carry out preliminary assessments of conservation status of 151 endemic woody plants of Western Ghats, based on the categories and criteria proposed by the IUCN. I applied IUCN Criterion B for risk assessments and found that more than 50% of the endemic woody plants are threatened (1.9% Critically endangered, 23.84% Endangered, 30.46% Vulnerable). Of 151 endemic species, only 56 species have been assigned a conservation status by IUCN.

Topic: 
DCC/WWC Meeting
Date & Time: 
11 Sep 2019 - 3:00pm
Event Type: 
Meeting
Venue: 
CES Seminar Hall, 3rd Floor, Biological Sciences Building
Abstract:

DCC/WWC Meeting

Topic: 
Controversies in wildlife management: feral cats, feral horses and dingoes
Speaker: 
Dr Euan Ritchie, Deakin University
Date & Time: 
25 Sep 2019 - 3:00pm
Event Type: 
Invited Seminar
Venue: 
CES Seminar Hall, 3rd Floor, Biological Sciences Building
Coffee/Tea: 
After the talk
Abstract:

Controversies in wildlife management: feral cats, feral horses and dingoes

Speaker Bio: 
Dr Euan Ritchie is an Associate Professor in Wildlife Ecology and Conservation in Deakin University’s Centre for Integrative Ecology and the School of Life and Environmental Sciences. He has published over 100 scientific articles related with biodiversity conservation and wildlife ecology and management. His work is focussed on predators and their ecological roles, the ecology, conservation and management of Australian mammals, and environmental policy. He was part of a research team whose work on the dingo won the NSW Office of Environment and Heritage Eureka Prize for Environmental Research in 2013 and is one of the Australian Chief Scientist’s ‘Science Superheroes’. He is also the director of the Ecology Society of Australia's Media Working Group, Deputy Convenor of Deakin University's Science and Society Network, a committee member of the Victorian government’s Wild Dog Management Advisory Committee, and a passionate and prolific science communicator. He has written 49 articles for The Conversation, read over 770,000 times.

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